There is an ever-increasing necessity for marketers to understand consumers and avoid the damaging effects of mistargeted content, according to consumer research in the UK, France and Germany by Customer Identity Management firm Janrain. This article is copyright 2015 The Best Customer Guide.

The research highlighted a growing trend of consumers who admit to intentionally providing misinformation when creating accounts that then leads to further mistargeting.

According to the click here, 88% of consumers have now come across a site offering social login capability, a rise from last year's results. This function allows users to register with a site via a social login platform such as Facebook, Twitter, Google or LinkedIn. The research also highlighted that companies offering this capability were deemed 67% more up to date and innovative. Further to this, consumers utilising the social login facility found it to be 49% faster than traditional registrations and 30% enjoyed having one less password to remember, overall making it a more positive and streamlined customer experience.

"This research shows the necessity for marketers to deliver an engaging and personalised experience. Brands are unable to deny the value of understanding the true identity of their consumers, and this is made possible with social login. By having guaranteed valuable data that consumers volunteer via their social platforms, organisations can make this change and be sure they are no longer mistargeting consumers," said Russell Loarridge, managing director (Europe) for Janrain.

The research also reveals the types of mistargeting that consumers were experiencing at a result of inefficient marketing. 61% of consumers reviewed had encountered an offer that clearly showed the company did not know who they were targeting. Furthermore, 40% actually encountered mistakes in the basic information about them and 36% felt there was mixed information across different methods of communication. With the majority surveyed viewing social login as an effective tool to increase the personalisation of their online experience and avoid mistargeting.

The study also revealed the alternate behaviour that consumers display when utilising the facility. Some 67% of consumers are more likely to return to a website that remembers them without a username or password. Consumers also are encouraged to engage more when social login is available, in fact 56% would read more articles on their mobile phone or tablet and 52% would make more purchases thereby reducing the barriers to mobile ecommerce.

"The research has revealed the expectations of consumers and the requirement for organisations to provide above and beyond this. Customers want an enjoyable and simple experience, which means no tedious login experiences and no frustrating mistargeted marketing content, all of which marketers can avoid by using a facility like social login," concluded Loarridge.